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What is your pathway to Smart Energy Communities?

What is a Smart Energy Community?

A Smart Energy Community seamlessly integrates local, renewable, and conventional energy sources to efficiently, cleanly, and affordably meet its energy needs. It is a coveted, highly livable place to live, work, learn, and play.

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Pathways

Community Implementation

When it comes to energy, the really exciting story is unfolding at home in your community. Communities influence nearly 60 percent of all energy consumption and over half of all GHG emissions, but they are struggling with a complex combination of social, environmental, and economic challenges—think affordability, poor air quality, gridlock, and shuttered storefronts.

Publications & Resources:

2016 QUEST Impact Report

2016 QUEST Impact Report

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubeGet your copy of the 2016 Impact Report and be among the first to know about: National research showing the state of the Smart Energy Communities marketplace and a glimpse into the future Critical connections and supportive policy actions...

Pathways

Infrastructure

Most of the energy use and GHG emissions in communities are associated with how we move around our communities using our transportation systems and where we spend most of our time – inside buildings. Smart Energy Communities consider how to improve the environmental performance of buildings, while also understanding the importance of integration with other systems such as transportation, land use planning. and local energy resources.

Publications & Resources:

Policies to Accelerate Community Energy Plans

Policies to Accelerate Community Energy Plans

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubePolicies to Accelerate Community Energy Plans: An Analysis of British Columbia, Ontario and the Northwest Territories identifies the effectiveness of provincial and territorial policies aimed at achieving widespread CEP development at the...

Community Energy Planning and Data

Community Energy Planning and Data

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubeThis primer addresses some of the issues facing small and rural communities in Ontario when gathering data for a CEP. The primer provides information on the type of data that small and rural communities should consider gathering and...

Pathways

Technology

Communities are advancing technology options such as district energy, combined heat and power, artificial intelligence, and the IoT that enable us to prepare for a low carbon future. The rate of change taking place is unprecedented and our current policy and economic regulatory systems aren’t keeping pace and likely won’t be able to either. Multi-stakeholder collaboration is required as we learn how to best enable new technologies and facilitate project implementation.

Publications & Resources:

2016 QUEST Impact Report

2016 QUEST Impact Report

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubeGet your copy of the 2016 Impact Report and be among the first to know about: National research showing the state of the Smart Energy Communities marketplace and a glimpse into the future Critical connections and supportive policy actions...

Community Energy Planning in Ontario

Community Energy Planning in Ontario

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubeThis primer, designed for small and mid-sized local governments, describes the cost of energy in Ontario’s communities, outlines some of the approaches available to keep energy dollars local, and provides access to helpful resources to...

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Pathways

Innovation

Technological change is constant, but transformative technological change is rare and this is what we are seeing in our energy systems. As we address both structural and policy challenges in our changing energy systems policymakers, utilities and energy services providers, regulators, builders and developers, and innovators, among others all need to work together to find solutions and enable innovation.

Publications & Resources:

2016 QUEST Impact Report

2016 QUEST Impact Report

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutubeGet your copy of the 2016 Impact Report and be among the first to know about: National research showing the state of the Smart Energy Communities marketplace and a glimpse into the future Critical connections and supportive policy actions...

2015 QUEST Impact Report

2015 QUEST Impact Report

facebooktwitterlinkedinyoutube It is with much excitement that QUEST – Quality Urban Energy Systems of Tomorrow – brings you the 2015 Impact Report – a snapshot of the research, engagement and advocacy work that is advancing Smart Energy Communities in Canada.  ...

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Principles for Smart Energy Communities

The successful implementation of Smart Energy Communities on any scale requires astute decision making on both the policy side and the technical side. QUEST has developed the following policy and technical principles in order to guide the effective implementation of Smart Energy Communities.

Technical Principles

Improve efficiency – first, reduce the energy input required for a given level of service

Optimize exergy – avoid using high-quality energy in low-quality applications

Manage heat – capture all feasible thermal energy and use it, rather than exhaust it

Reduce waste – use all available resources, such as landfill gas and municipal, agricultural, industrial, and forestry wastes

Use renewable energy resources – tap into local opportunities for geoexchange systems, small scale hydro, biomass, biogas, solar, wind
energy, and opportunities for inter-seasonal storage

Use energy delivery systems strategically – optimize use of energy delivery systems and use them as a resource to ensure reliability and for energy storage to meet varying demands

Policy Principles

Match land use needs and mobility options – understand the energy implication of land use, infrastructure for water and wastewater, waste management, personal mobility, goods movement, and building design decisions

Match energy options to local context – local climate, building on land use choices, industrial structure, availability of local sources of waste and renewables

Send clear and accurate price signals – consumers should see and pay full real costs, including external costs

Manage risks and be flexible – maintain technological and fuel diversity; pursue cost-effective opportunities first and incorporate learning; assume the need to adapt quickly to market and technological surprises

Emphasize performance and outcomes in policy and regulations – avoid prescribing fuels and technologies

Pursue policy and program stability – maintain a consistent and predictable decision making environment to sustain investor confidence